Launch of Alba Londres 8 – Brazilian Contemporary Feminisms

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(Photo: Taraneh Mosadegh)

Alba Londres is launching an issue of its magazine dedicated to explore contemporary Brazilian feminist poetics, in association with Carnaval Press. Brazilian poets Adelaide Ivánova, Adriana Zapparoli, Carla Diacov, Érica Zingano, Flávia Rocha, Jussara Salazar and Virna Teixeira are published in translation in the habitual bilingual amazing edition of the magazine co-edited by Jèssica Pujol and Virna Teixeira. We also invited two Brazilian writers, Cristina Judar and Assionara Souza, who contributed with short stories for this issue.

Latin America has a very high prevalence of gender violence, with Brazil occupying recently the fifth position in the world ranking of female murders. This special edition aims to reflect on this alarming violence against women in Brazil, and on how Brazilian women poets reflect about the theme in their writing.

Alba Londres is a magazine that publishes experimental Spanish, Portuguese and British poetry in translation since 2011 and this is its eight issue. Carnaval Press was created in London in 2015, and is the first small press dedicated to publish and present Brazilian contemporary poetry and lusophone poetry in translation to the British readers.

We would like to invite you to the launch, which will take place at the Brazilian Embassy on the 9th of March 2017, with readers:

Adelaide Ivánova and Virna Teixeira

…and their translators: Annie McDermott, Lotto Thiessen, Jèssica Pujol and Francisco Vilhena

RSVP essential  (culturalbrazil.rsvp@gmail.com)

Brazilian Embassy – Gallery 32. 14-16 Cockspur Street, London, SW1Y 5BL. Phone: 020 77474500

Poetry and mental health

To celebrate the opening of the Museum of Futures Visual Poetry Exhibition, a ‘Camarade’ collaborative poetry reading was held with 24 poets associated with the exhibition reading new work written for the night in 12 pairs. The event was held on February 23rd 2017 in Surbiton, UK. http://www.theenemiesproject.com/futures

Reading at the Museum of Futures with Albert Pellicer:

Women and illicit drug use in cinema

After analysing more than sixty films for a MSc in Medical Humanities entitled “Women and Illicit Substance Use in Cinema”, I am starting a series of posts on filmic representations of female drug users.

Part 1 – Female drug users in Woody Allen’s films

After cocaine resurgence in the 1970s, Woody Allen was probably one of the first filmmakers to depict the expensive substance – used at that time by wealthy bohemian people – in a comic scene in ‘Anne Hall’ (1977). Annie, by the way, smokes weed, dresses in an unconventional style, and is open to drug experimentation:

Another interesting reference of cocaine use in the 1980s appears in ‘Hannah and Her Sisters’ (1986). The movie depicts Holly (Dianne Wiest), a struggling actress with a former cocaine habit. Holly appears snorting cocaine openly in the audience of a punk rock band in a legendary club in New York,  a reference to 1980s cocaine abuse in that scene. Her date Mickey (Allen) says to her that she will develop ‘a third nostril’, takes her to a jazz club, but she continues restlessly snorting coke there:

Holly wears bold outfits, but is insecure. When she stops using cocaine she has difficulties to adjust to an occupation, has a novelty-seeker nature and a competitive relationship with a female friend. Her parents are alcoholic and narcissistic, and her sister attends Alcoholic Anonymous meetings and has a clandestine affair with Hannah’s husband, showing a complicated family dynamic.

Hannah is apparently a successful woman, who has a co-dependent relationship with Holly, supporting financially her new schemes to make money. However, along her self-analysis and determination, Holly grows up, becomes a successful playwright and marries Mickey. Her former cocaine abuse appears as a rite of passage, as she becomes more integrated with herself

Workshop: Phenomenology, anxiety and breath — Mental health, Ethics and Law at King’s

Friday March 17 2017, 9.30-4.30. Advance notice for this workshop, which is sponsored by the generous support of the Wellcome Trust. Speakers: Dylan Trigg (UCD), The phenomenology of anxiety Ulrika Maude (Bristol), DH Lawrence and the body Michael Lewis (Newcastle), Breath in the history of philosophy Petr Kouba (Prague), On Nancy’s ‘The Intruder’ Emiliano Trizio (UWE), […]

via Workshop: Phenomenology, anxiety and breath — Mental health, Ethics and Law at King’s

Jo Spence at Tate Britain

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Jo Spence (1934–92) challenged the way in which women were represented, and was a pioneering on the application of photography as a therapeutic tool. Drawing on her personal experiences with breast cancer and the use of performance, she commented on broader political issues. Her work is being exhibited at Tate Britain together with her collaboration with the socialist-feminist collective Hackney Flashers.

Where: Tate Britain. Main hall. Free entrance. Until Autumn 2016.

Conference: Owning Our Emotions — Emotion, Authenticity and the Self

21st – 28th September, 2016.

Institute of Philosophy, Room 349, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU. Keynote speakers include: Professor Monika Betzler, Ludwig-Maximilians Universität, Munich Professor Kristján Kristjánsson, University of Birmingham Professor Denis McManus, University of Southampton Dr Carolyn Price, The Open University Professor Fabrice Teroni, University of Geneva Dr Jonathan Webber, University of Cardiff […]

via Conference: Owning Our Emotions — Emotion, Authenticity and the Self — Mental health, Ethics and Law at King’s

Real Boy

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Just saw Real Boy this week at the BFI Flare London LGBT Film Festival. It’s a beautiful documentary about the story of Bennett Wallace, a transgender teenager in California and his transitional journey through childhood and young adulthood, working to gain the love and support of his mother and to become a musician. The film explores issues on mental health experienced by Bennett and problems with substance misuse by another transgender friend.

Real Boy will be released soon and the trailer can be accessed here. People interested to bring it to their community center, college, conference, or film club, can email director Shaleece Haas at shaleece@realboymovie.com.

Architecture, nature and wellbeing

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The close relationship between neurons, beauty, arts, and wellbeing. How our mirror neurons observe other people’s behavior and perceive environment? The concept of therapeutic architecture and how a hospital can be therapeutic just by architecture and environment…

Interesting article by Maria Giulia Marini, an Italian epidemiologist and counselor at the Centre of Medical Humanities website.

 

Who cares for the caregiver?

Interesting film about the morality of the care industry. Tim Roth plays a nurse battling with the weight of his patients’ terminal illnesses and become obsessed about their lives, while being disconnected of his own past and wounds. Directed by Mexican film maker Michel Franco, Chronic (2015) shows a superb and enigmatic performance by Tim Roth.